Archive for the 'Digital Earth Systems' Category



e-Trikala S.A. – The First Digital City in Greece

e-trikala

Since 2004, e-trikala , in cooperation with and in the line of the operational program “The Information Society” is acting in the fields of new broadband technologies, successfully implementing municipal projects. On the 8th of April, 2008, having the required experience, it was transformed into e-Trikala S.A., an emerging company, formed within the Municipality of Trikala, Greece.

By creating infrastructure and by providing services, e-Trikala continuously aims to the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) based applications, oriented to the improvement of all citizens’ everyday life, in a medium sized city, simplifying public transactions, reducing telecommunication costs and delivering new services related to the local way of life. Moreover, these ICT applications offer new ways and methods that enable citizens participate on policy-making, while in parallel establish local Government and Public Authorities as guarantors of local society’s every day proper, digital and distanced operation.

e-Trikala S.A. operates upon a fully integrated basis while, as the First Digital City in Greece (proclaimed in 2004 by the Minister of Economics, Mr. Folias), it establishes high technological and broadband National standards by using and offering its “know-how” to other municipalities within Greece.

During the last couple of years, e-Trikala is cooperating with the Central Union of Greek Municipalities ( ΚΕΔΚΕ ), serving as a consulting company, using research and development strategies, regarding the country’s technological as well as economic growth.

The company’s main areas of expertise are:

  • e-transportation
  • e-education
  • e-health
  • e-government & e-democracy
  • geographical information systems
  • networks (Wi-Fi, fiber optic, Wi-Max pilot application & operation)
  • event planning & organizing (exhibitions, conferences, galas)

e-Trikala projects refer to a number of actions and infrastructure, which aim to the development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) based applications, oriented to the improvement of citizens’ everyday life, in a medium sized city.

As we are moving through the 21st century and as we deploy technology and its advantages, every citizen has the opportunity to enjoy useful applications for their everyday transactions, their distanced servicing as well as local and touristic information services. The e-trikala team operates under the new broadband reality of things, while it creates and provides digital projects, integrated broadband applications and e-services for the citizens.

The field of overall National, European and International activities until today includes:

  • Official INEC membership (International Network of e-Communities) membership
  • Lead partnership of the European project INTERREG Digital Cities
  • Host and lead organizers of the Broadband Cities 2008 (INEC’s annual conference)
  • Candidate and Smart21 award winner during the Broadband Economy 2009 Annual Summit in New York
  • Founder of the first Digital Community S.A. in Greece consisting of 11 municipalities of central Greece (1,5 million people)
  • Participation in “e-Health based Chronic Disease Management 2008” in Slovenia
  • Αctive in E-health European projects (ISISEMD, e-HealthRegion, WISEE, LivingLabThessaly, RenewingHealth, INDEPENDENT)
  • Recently member in the Global Cities Dialogue network
  • Partnership in the European project ISISEMD.

 

Source: http://www.e-trikala.gr/en

A New Virtual Museum: Www.Muvicc.Es

Muvicc

A new concept of Museum was born on June 30, 2012. Taking advantage of the latest technologies for virtual visits to archaeological sites and Photogrammetry 3D objects, was created the first Museum Virtual of the culture Castro (www.muvicc.es) under the name of MUVICC.

A new technological tool for dissemination and digitization of objects, museums and archaeological sites.

 

Source: http://www.muvicc.es

Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE)

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The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) (http://www.dlese.org/library/index.jsp) is a distributed community effort involving educators, students, and scientists working together to improve the quality, quantity, and efficiency of teaching and learning about the Earth system at all levels.

DLESE supports Earth system science education by providing:

  • Access to high-quality collections of educational resources
  • Access to Earth data sets and imagery, including the tools and interfaces that enable their effective use in educational settings
  • Support services to help educators and learners effectively create, use, and share educational resources
  • Communication networks to facilitate interactions and collaborations across all dimensions of Earth system education

DLESE resources include electronic materials for both teachers and learners, such as lesson plans, maps, images, data sets, visualizations, assessment activities, curriculum, online courses, and much more.

The National Science Foundation provided funding for the development of DLESE which is now operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Computational and Information Systems Laboratory and the NCAR Library on behalf of the education community.

 

Source: http://www.dlese.org/library/index.jsp

The digital-earth.eu project

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The digital-earth.eu project examines the use of geographic media in schools and teacher education. Geo-media is the visualisation of information from different media sources and is concerned with digital content and its processing based on place, position and location. Many geographic media are widely used for navigation and routing purposes. Cartographic communication has never been so easy to implement, therefore 21st century school education needs to include geo-media into daily work. Innovative approaches to teaching and learning are needed to study environments from local to global scale.

The digital-earth.eu network links innovative centres around Europe where geo-media use is well developed. Products, resources, experiences and ideas are shared between the centres and opened to the public wherever possible.

A digital-earth.eu infrastructure is under development. The European Centre and an accredited network of national and regional Centres of Excellence are developing an online catalogue of materials, courses, publications, links and good practice scenarios, and are publishing a series of core publications.

 

Source: http://www.digital-earth.eu

Digital Globes Offer a Dynamic Vision

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Chip Clark/Smithsonian Institution

The six-foot-wide “Science on a Sphere” was created by NOAA as a tool to teach earth sciences.

By MARK VANHOENACKER

In the main hall of the hands-on science exhibits at the Cape Town Science Center in South Africa, a lifeless, tattered globe stands under naked fluorescent bulbs, all but ignored by children passing through on school tours.

Across a sunblasted courtyard and up a dingy staircase, another globe — a digital globe — stands in a darkened room. This globe is a shining sphere of light. Children stand awe-struck; adults of a certain age may be reminded of images like Apollo 8’s Earthrise photograph, while Tolkien fans of all ages will recall the spherical, swirling “palantír” of Saruman in “The Lord of the Rings” (forged in the days when Middle Earth was still flat).

Until recently, cost and technical limitations have largely confined these modern spheres to institutional settings like science centers. But as technology improves and prices fall, it’s growing more likely that a digital orb will someday arrive in a classroom or boardroom — even a living room — near you.

As the name suggests, a digital globe is a spherically shaped display screen. Like the old-school globes once common in classrooms, digital globes vary in size, but a typical model is about 24 inches across. Unlike the globes of your childhood, the image on a digital globe can be changed with the touch of a button. Controlled by a keyboard or tablet computer, a digital globe can toggle between familiar, static images, like the world’s political boundaries, topography or vegetation. It can animate complex phenomena, like the formation of weather systems, the effect of global warming on wolverine habitats or the annual pulse of sea ice. It can display the surface of the moon, the churning azure cloudscapes of Neptune or the celestial globe — the night sky.

To read the full article, please click here.

 

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/08/science/digital-globes-a-new-way-to-view-the-world.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2&smid=fb-share


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