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IJDE Special issue on “Storage, Integration and Processing of Digital Earth Data”

IJDE_Callforpapers_DEdata_banner_20140326

Special issue on “Storage, Integration and Processing of Digital Earth Data”

Guest editors:

François Pinet, Irstea, Clermont-Ferrand France.

Sandro Bimonte, Irstea, Clermont-Ferrand France.

Petraq Papajorgji, CanadianInstitute of Technology, Albania.

Submission deadline: September 30th, 2014

Digital Earth is the name given to a concept used for “describing a virtual representation of the Earth that is geo-referenced and connected to the world’s digital knowledge archives”. A very large amount of data is produced to represent multiple facets of our planet. As a result of continuous developments and massive use of new information and communication technologies, there is a considerable increase in sources of geo-referenced data. In recent years, new scientific and technological advances in the fields of sensors networks, remote sensing systems, spatial data infrastructures, Web technologies and volunteer geographical systems have increased the availability of spatial information at different geographical scales. Advances in computing have also enabled scientists to develop complex models for simulating earth phenomena (e.g. global climate change) that produce a huge volume of data. All these information require effective storage methods, as well as designing effective integration and processing techniques. New database technologies must be invented to better represent the complexity of spatial data (e.g., uncertainty; complex structures), to guarantee the quality of integrated data and to process the huge amount of information available (e.g. use of spatial data warehouses; non-relational databases; processing of raster databases or continuous fields).

The purpose of this special issue is to present the latest advances in the field of spatial databases for digital earth (focusing on data storage, integration and processing). Various application areas can be presented (earth observation, geosciences, environment, agriculture, natural hazards, etc.). The main topics of the special issue will be:

  • Databases for storing data produced from remote sensing systems
  • Storage of data collected by sensors networks
  • Spatial data query and aggregations in large infrastructures (relational databases, No SQL, etc.)
  • Continuous fields and raster databases: representation, map algebra and performance issues
  • Spatial data integration and Extraction-Transformation-Loading tools
  • Efficient storage, integration and processing of volunteered geographic information
  • Spatial data warehouses and Online Analytical Processing tools
  • New spatial data standards and infrastructures
  • Spatial data quality management and integrity constraints
  • Spatial “big data”
  • Spatial data storage in cloud computing
  • Spatial databases of simulation results
  • Digital earth data and ontologies
  • Spatial data mining in digital earth data
  • New conceptual, logical and physical spatial data representations
  • New models for representing uncertain spatial data
  • etc.

The paper submission deadline is September 30th, 2014.

Authors will submit their manuscripts on-line http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tjde20

 

Source: http://digitalearth-isde.org/news/667 (ISDE Secretariat)

 

ESA’s 7th EO Summer School, ESA/ESRIN, 04 to 14 August 2014

EOSS2014_poster

European Space Agency (ESA) organises a series of summer schools on Monitoring of the Earth System to promote the exploitation of Earth Observation EO data across disciplines, with a specific focus on their assimilation into Earth System models.

The two-week course, held in ESA/ESRIN (near Rome, Italy) during August (typically every two years) aims to provide students with an integrated end-to-end perspective going from measurement techniques to end-user applications. Courses include lectures covering issues related to Remote Sensing, Earth System Modelling and Data Assimilation as well as hands-on computing exercises on the processing of EO data. Students have the opportunity to present their work during a poster session. The three best posters will receive an award from the European Meteorological Society (EMS). Keynote lectures on global change issues are also given to discuss the current state of the science of global change and its relationship to society in order to help students appreciate how their specific field fits into a broader scientific and political context. For more information, please see previous programme, news or video.

The school is open to Early Career Scientists (i.e. Ph.D. students, young post-doctoral scientists) who are specialised in a variety of Earth Science disciplines and wish to expand and improve their knowledge and skills. Participation is limited to a maximum of 60 students and is highly competitive. There is no fee for the school but students are expected to cover their own travel and accommodation cost (unfortunately, financial support is not available).

All enquiries should be addressed to eotraining@esa.int

Students wishing to participate can apply online at
https://earth.esa.int/web/eo-summer-school/application-submission

 

Source: https://earth.esa.int/web/eo-summer-school/home

TIMELAPSE Project: “Time and Space”

TimeLapse

Spacecraft and telescopes are not built by people interested in what’s going on at home. Rockets fly in one direction: up. Telescopes point in one direction: out. Of all the cosmic bodies studied in the long history of astronomy and space travel, the one that got the least attention was the one that ought to matter most to us Earth.

That changed when NASA created the Landsat program, a series of satellites that would perpetually orbit our planet, looking not out but down. Surveillance spacecraft had done that before, of course, but they paid attention only to military or tactical sites. Landsat was a notable exception, built not for spycraft but for public monitoring of how the human species was altering the surface of the planet. Two generations, eight satellites and millions of pictures later, the space agency, along with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), has accumulated a stunning catalog of images that, when riffled through and stitched together, create a high-definition slide show of our rapidly changing Earth. TIME is proud to host the public unveiling of these images from orbit, which for the first time date all the way back to 1984.

Over here is Dubai, growing from sparse desert metropolis to modern, sprawling megalopolis. Over there are the central-pivot irrigation systems turning the sands of Saudi Arabia into an agricultural breadbasket — a surreal green-on-brown polka-dot pattern in the desert. Elsewhere is the bad news: the high-speed retreat of Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska; the West Virginia Mountains decapitated by the mining industry; the denuded forests of the Amazon, cut to stubble by loggers.

It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail. Consider: a standard TV image uses about one-third of a million pixels per frame, while a high-definition image uses 2 million. The Landsat images, by contrast, weigh in at 1.8 trillion pixels per frame, the equivalent of 900,000 high-def TVs assembled into a single mosaic.

These Timelapse pictures tell the pretty and not-so-pretty story of a finite planet and how its residents are treating it — razing even as we build, destroying even as we preserve. It takes a certain amount of courage to look at the videos, but once you start, it’s impossible to look away.

Source: http://world.time.com/timelapse

 

5th Open Source Opportunities in GIS Summer School: Open Web Services & Web Map Applications, 7-11 July 2014, Girona, Spain

5th Open Source GIS Summer School

The GIS and Remote Sensing Centre of the University of Girona, the Nottingham Geospatial Institute of the University of Nottingham and Prodevelop (partner of OpenGeo) welcome you to the 5th Open Source GIS Summer School which will be focused on the development and creation of Open Web Mapping Services and Web Applications.

The Open Source Opportunities in GIS Summer School of Girona is an initiative aimed to meet the GIS professional demands related to free and open solutions.

GIS Open Source Summer School 2014 aims to build upon the success of the previous editions to ensure the highest quality of results and to prepare students in an international working environment and to develop competitive skills with emphasis on collaboration during the course. We started on this initiative focussing on the advantages of using Free and Open Source Software for GIS from the first edition of this Summer School.

If you are interested in application development and creation of web map services using the most widely used free and open source market products such as PostGIS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, then this is your opportunity.

Applications to the Summer School must be submitted before 27th June.

 

Source: http://www.sigte.udg.edu/summerschool2014

Sentinel-1 aids Balkans flood relief

Flood_map_node_full_image_2

Although not yet operational, the new Sentinel-1A satellite has provided radar data for mapping the floods in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Heavy rainfall leading to widespread flooding and landslides has hit large parts of the Balkans, killing dozens of people and leaving hundreds of thousands displaced.

Jan Kucera of the Europan Commission’s Joint Research Centre is supervising the technical aspect of the Copernicus Emergency Management Service (EMS). While mapping the flooding in northeastern Bosnia and Herzegovina, ESA delivered a radar scan from Sentinel-1A: “I had a first look and discovered that we were missing an important flooded area visible in the middle of the image.”

Although the radar on Sentinel-1A is still being calibrated, the new information could be integrated into the Copernicus EMS flood maps of the Sava river in the Balatun area in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

“In emergency situations like these, it is important that we optimise all the available data to produce better maps for disaster relief efforts.”

The radar on Sentinel-1 is able to ‘see’ through clouds, rain and in darkness, making it particularly useful for monitoring floods. Images acquired before and after a flood offer immediate information on the extent of inundation and support assessments of property and environmental damage.

Sentinel-1A was launched on 3 April, and is the first in a fleet of Sentinel satellites developed for Europe’s Copernicus environment monitoring programme.

Sentinel-1A_scan_node_full_image_2

Sentinel-1A scan

Although the satellite is still being commissioned, this Balkan coverage is an early example of the kind of operational data the mission will provide for emergency response.

Once operational, Sentinel-1 will revolutionise the use of satellites in risk assessment management and emergency response with its provision of large amounts of radar data in a systematic fashion.

The new scans are also being used by the International Charter Space and Major Disasters, which was activated by the Russian risk management authorities involved in flood response in Serbia.

The Charter is an international collaboration between the owners and operators of Earth observation missions to provide rapid access to satellite data to help disaster management authorities.

 

Source: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/Copernicus/Sentinel-1/Sentinel-1_aids_Balkan_flood_relief

Big Processing of Geospatial Data

Geospatial Data has always been Big Data. Now Big Data Analytics for geospatial data is available to allow users to analyze massive volumes of geospatial data. Petabyte archives for remotely sensed geodata were being planned in the 1980s, and growth has met expectations. Add to this the ever increasing volume and reliability of real time sensor observations, the need for high performance, big data analytics for modeling and simulation of geospatially enabled content is greater than ever. In the past, limited access to the processing power that makes high volume or high velocity collection of geospatial data useful for many applications has been a bottleneck.  Workstations capable of fast geometric processing of vector geodata brought a revolution in GIS. Now big processing through cloud computing and analytics can make greater sense of data and deliver the promised value of imagery and all other types of geospatial information.

Cloud initiatives have accelerated lightweight client access to powerful processing services hosted at remote locations.   The recent ESA/ESRIN “Big Data from Space” event addressed challenges posed by policies for dissemination, data search, sharing, transfer, mining, analysis, fusion and visualization. A wide range of topics, scenarios and technical resources were discussed. In addition to the projects discussed at that event, several other big data initiatives have been launched to increase capabilities to processing geospatial data: the European Commission’s Big Data Public Private Forum, the US National Science Foundation’s Big Data Science & Engineering, and the US Office of Science and Technology Policy’s (OSTP) Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI).

Read more at http://www.opengeospatial.org/blog/1866

 

Source: http://www.opengeospatial.org/blog/1866

 

NASA Airborne Research Focuses on Andean Volcanoes

dsc_0423_crew

NASA’s C-20A crew is shown preparing for flight from Tocumen International Airport in Panama City, Panama. The aircraft was deployed to Central and South America for a research study using JPL’s UAVSAR located in an underbelly belly pod (note red cover).

Image Credit: 

NASA / Stu Broce

Volcanoes in Central and South America were the primary focus of a four-week Earth science study in late April and early May 2014 using a NASA-developed airborne synthetic aperture imaging radar.

uavsar_ubinas_0

The synthetic aperture radar developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory mounted on NASA’s C-20A research aircraft captured this image of Peru’s Ubinas volcano on April 14, 2014, during its Latin American research mission. The false colors represent different polarizations in the image.

Image Credit: 

NASA JPL UAVSAR / Ron Muellerschoen

The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar, or UAVSAR, developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, was carried in a specialized pod on NASA’s C-20A. The 29-day deployment ended May 6 when the aircraft returned to its base in Palmdale, California after 19 flights totaling 97 hours in the air.

This is the second consecutive year the UAVSAR team has conducted a campaign to study sites in Central and South America. Many of the flights imaged the Andean volcanic belt located in western South America.

“By combining images acquired in 2013 with the 2014 images, researchers will produce detailed surface motion measurements to improve volcanic deformation models,” said Naiara Pinto, the UAVSAR science coordinator from JPL’s Suborbital Radar Science and Engineering group.

In coordination with the volcano studies, the agency’s C-20A gathered data over Amazonian forests in Peru, agricultural sites in Chile and glaciers in the Chilean/Argentinian border region. These data will aid in algorithm development and sensor calibration activities, improving scientists’ ability to monitor and study Earth’s carbon and water cycles. All of these research projects involve Latin American institutions, including universities and hazard monitoring agencies.

NASA’s C-20A, the military designation for the Gulfstream III aircraft, features a high-precision autopilot designed and developed by engineers at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California, allowing the aircraft to fly the same flight lines this spring as those flown in 2013.

ubinas_plume

The Ubinas Volcano, located in southern Peru, is the country’s most active volcano. This image was captured from NASA’s C-20A as it flew UAVSAR flight lines during a study of Central and South American volcanoes.

Image Credit: 

NASA / David Fedors

The Precision Platform Autopilot guides the aircraft by using a kinematic differential Global Positioning System developed by JPL in concert with the aircraft’s inertial navigation system to enable it to fly repeat paths to an accuracy of 15 feet or less. With the precision autopilot engaged, the synthetic aperture radar is able to acquire repeat-pass data that can measure land-surface changes within centimeters.

This mission was conducted under NASA’s Airborne Science Program.

NASA and its partners monitor Earth’s vital signs from land, air and space with a fleet of satellites and ambitious airborne and ground-based observation campaigns. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth’s interconnected natural systems with long-term data records and computer analysis tools to better see how our planet is changing. The agency shares this unique knowledge with the global community and works with institutions in the United States and around the world that contribute to understanding and protecting our home planet.

For more information about NASA’s Earth science activities in 2014, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

For more information about the UAVSAR, visit:

http://uavsar.jpl.nasa.gov/

Beth Hagenauer, Public Affairs
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center

 

Source:

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/armstrong/Features/C-20A_studies_andean_volcanos.html

 

 

Photogrammetric Computer Vision – PCV 2014

ISPRS Technical Commission III Midterm Symposium

5th – 7th September 2014, Zurich, Switzerland, In Conjunction with the European Conference on Computer Vision

PCV 2014

The Midterm Symposium of Technical Commission III takes place every four years in between ISPRS Congresses. The Symposium is an important event of ISPRS Technical Commission III and is to provide an inter-disciplinary forum for scientists, researchers and practitioners in the field of “Photogrammetric Computer Vision and Image Analysis”. The participants of the Symposium will present the latest developments and applications, discuss cutting-edge technologies and exchange research ideas.

Call for Papers

PCV 2014 is the mid-term symposium of ISPRS TC III “Photogrammetric Computer Vision and Image Analysis”.

We are looking forward to welcoming researchers in photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision, image analysis and related fields, to present and discuss their work. A single-track program with keynote talks, oral and poster presentations shall provide ample opportunities for scientific exchange and discussion.

PCV 2014 invites submissions of high-quality research results as either full papers or abstracts.

Full-paper submissions will undergo a selective double-blind peer-review process, normally by three members of the international reviewing committee, and will be published in the ISPRS Annals. Submitted papers will be refereed on their scientific originality and relevance, presentation and empirical results. The deadline for full-paper submissions is April 13, 2014 and it will not be extended. For details on formatting, submission and paper policies please see the instructions for authors.

Abstract submissions provide an opportunity to discuss late-breaking results and research in progress, and will be published in the ISPRS Archives. Abstracts shall also report original scientific or applied research, and will be subject to a simplified screening process. The deadline for submissions is June 19, 2014. For details on formatting, submission and paper policies please see the instructions for authors.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • sensor orientation and surface reconstruction
  • integrated sensor modeling and navigation
  • 3d point cloud processing
  • image sequences and multi-temporal analysis
  • scene analysis and 3d reconstruction
  • graphics and visualization techniques for remote sensing
  • pattern analysis for remote sensing and mapping

For further keyword and topics, see the terms of reference of TC III working groups.

A Best Paper Prize and a Best Student Paper Prize will be at the conference.

As organizers of PCV 2014 we are looking forward to your contributions and to welcoming you in Zürich.

Konrad Schindler
Nicholas Paparoditis
Wilfried Hartmann

Registration

The PCV 2014 Symposium runs from September 5 (~13:00) to September 7 (~17:00). It is co-located with ECCV 2014, which runs from September 8 to September 12. Attendees are encouraged to attend both conferences. We offer a reduced rate for joint registration (25-30% discount).

The registration website is not yet available, and is expected to be launched beginning of June.

Source: http://www.igp.ethz.ch/photogrammetry/pcv2014/index.html

 

The State of Rain

Rift-Valley-fig-1

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a satellite-based rainfall monitoring dataset specifically designed to support the early detection of drought around the world. The State of Rain: http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/the-state-of-rain/?from=title

Developed as a partnership between the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) Climate Hazards Group, this new dataset allows experts who specialize in the early warning of drought and famine to monitor rainfall in near real-time, at a high resolution, over most of the globe (from 50°N to 50°S).

Read more at: http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/the-state-of-rain/?from=title

 

Source:

http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/the-state-of-rain/?from=title

 

5th Digital Earth Summit 2014

Digital Erth Summit

Digital Earth for ESD (Education for Sustainable Development)
November 9–11, 2014 Nagoya, Japan

The International Society for Digital Earth will be hosting the 5th Digital Earth
Summit, under the theme “Digital Earth for ESD”, from 9 – 11 November 2014 in Nagoya, Japan. This planned Digital Earth Summit will focus on how Digital Earth technologies and activities have contributed or will contribute to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). Digital Earth technologies are one of the key technologies to support ESD by visualizing complicated earth system, social system and not only for the current situation but from the past to the future.

Call for Abstracts
The international program committee invites submissions of abstracts on any
of the scientific topics selected this year:
1. Digital Earth for ESD
• Digital Earth for sustainable society and future earth
• Systems thinking, critical thinking for global issues
• Integrated, holistic approach by geospatial information science
• Environment, and disaster education
• Carrier development
2. Digital Earth for Citizen Science
• ICT, cloud services and sourcing
• Big data
• Institutional approach
3. and more …

Deadline of Abstract Submission has been extended to June 9th.

Registration
Online registration is available at:
https://cos.congre.co.jp/gis2014/e/reg.php

 

Source: http://www.isde-j.com/summit2014

 


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