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From Imagery to Map: Digital Photogrammetric Technologies, 14th International Scientific and Technical Conference

Photogrammetric_Conference

The 14th International Scientific and Technical Conference will be held on October 20-23, 2014 in Hainan, China.

About the conference

The role of remote sensing and photogrammetric technologies is constantly increasing. Therefore, each new conference that is devoted to this topic truly becomes a marquee event.

Every year our conference brings together the best specialists of the field from dozens of countries and provides them excellent opportunities for professional communication and discussion. Permanent participants of the Conference are such leading companies in the remote sensing field as DigitalGlobe (USA), Airbus Defence and Space (EU), enterprises of the Federal Space Agency (Russia), SCANEX R&D Center (Russia), Hexagon (Sweden), Microsoft/Vexcel (Austria), and VisionMap (Israel). The use of satellite and aerial surveys is presented by industry leaders such as FSUE Roslesinforg (Russia), JSC Roscartography (Russia), Gazprom VNIIGAZ (Russia), KazGeoCosmos (Kazakhstan), Eurosense (Belgium), Leibniz University Hannover (Germany), MapWorldTechnologies (India), and many others.

One of the features of the Conference is its annual change in location. This not only allows for a variety of Conference work, but it also opens up new opportunities. This year we chose China as the venue, taking into account the increased influence of Chinese on the remote sensing and geoinformation market.

Currently the Chinese market is one of the most challenging consumers and suppliers of geospatial data. Due to China’s huge area, rapid economic growth, and advances in space technology, the world’s leading companies aspire to work with this nation. Our decision to hold the next Conference in China is further proof of the great importance of the Chinese market to methods of remote sensing development and photogrammetry technologies.

How will participation in the conference benefit you? First of all this is a unique opportunity to share your own experience and get acquainted with the achievements of colleagues, as well as take in large amounts of interesting and very useful information. You should consider that our Conference is covered broadly by leading Russian and foreign industry mass media. It also allows participants and sponsors to network with each other and create new contacts.

Based on the experience of previous conferences, there is no doubt that this will be a very interesting, vivid, and memorable event. We hope you will take part in the upcoming conference.

For those who are interested to attend this conference, kindly visit the link below for more information:

http://conf.racurs.ru/conf2014/eng/

 

Source: http://conf.racurs.ru/conf2014/eng/

Geospatial Analysis – A comprehensive guide – A free web-based GIS resource

geospatial-analysis

A free web-based GIS resource – Dr Michael de Smith and Prof Paul Longley, University College London, and Prof Mike Goodchild, UC Santa Barbara

Geospatial Analysis book online – web version

Geospatial Analysis book online – PDF version  

The full text of “Geospatial Analysis – A comprehensive guide” is provided on this website. It covers the full spectrum of analytical techniques that are provided within modern Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related software products.Click here for a PDF extract (first 60 pages, links not enabled).Topics covered in detail include:

  • Geospatial analysis concepts
  • Analytical methodologies and model building
  • Core components of geospatial analysis, including distance and directional analysis, geometrical processing, map algebra, and grid models
  • Exploratory Spatial and Spatio-temporal Data Analysis (ESDA, ESTDA) and spatial statistics, including spatial autocorrelation and spatial regression
  • Surface analysis, including surface form and flow analysis, gridding and interpolation methods, and visibility analysis
  • Network and locational analysis, including shortest path calculation, travelling salesman problems, facility location and arc routing
  • Geocomputational methods, including agent-based modelling, artifical neural networks and evolutionary computing

“Written in an engaging and accessible manner, this book does a marvelous job of balancing its coverage on principles, techniques, and software tools for spatial analysis. … It is truly a tour de force of geospatial analysis and is likely to become a classic …I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning about the latest developments in geospatial analysis and modeling.” Prof D Z Sui, Review in: Annals, Association of American Geographers, April 2009.

 

Source: http://www.spatialanalysisonline.com

Kartograph – A simple framework to build interactive digital map applications

Cartograph

Kartograph is a simple and lightweight framework for building interactive map applications without Google Maps or any other mapping service. It was created with the needs of designers and data journalists in mind.

Actually, Kartograph is two libraries. One generates beautiful & compact SVG maps; the other helps you to create interactive maps that run across all major browsers.

Kartograph.py

A powerful Python library for generating beautiful, Illustrator-friendly SVG maps.

  • Renders vector maps from shapefiles and PostGIS
  • Compact SVGs using Visvalingam simplification
  • Stores metadata in data attributes
  • Built on top of GDAL/OGR and shapely
  • Licensed under AGPL

Kartograph.js

A JavaScript library for creating interactive maps based on Kartograph.py SVG maps.

  • Easy to use: create an interactve map within minutes.
  • Runs 100% stand-alone. No server needed.
  • Gracefully degrades to Internet Explorer 7+
  • Built on top of Raphaël and jQuery
  • Licensed under LGPL

 

Source: http://kartograph.org

IJDE Special issue on “Storage, Integration and Processing of Digital Earth Data”

IJDE_Callforpapers_DEdata_banner_20140326

Special issue on “Storage, Integration and Processing of Digital Earth Data”

Guest editors:

François Pinet, Irstea, Clermont-Ferrand France.

Sandro Bimonte, Irstea, Clermont-Ferrand France.

Petraq Papajorgji, CanadianInstitute of Technology, Albania.

Submission deadline: September 30th, 2014

Digital Earth is the name given to a concept used for “describing a virtual representation of the Earth that is geo-referenced and connected to the world’s digital knowledge archives”. A very large amount of data is produced to represent multiple facets of our planet. As a result of continuous developments and massive use of new information and communication technologies, there is a considerable increase in sources of geo-referenced data. In recent years, new scientific and technological advances in the fields of sensors networks, remote sensing systems, spatial data infrastructures, Web technologies and volunteer geographical systems have increased the availability of spatial information at different geographical scales. Advances in computing have also enabled scientists to develop complex models for simulating earth phenomena (e.g. global climate change) that produce a huge volume of data. All these information require effective storage methods, as well as designing effective integration and processing techniques. New database technologies must be invented to better represent the complexity of spatial data (e.g., uncertainty; complex structures), to guarantee the quality of integrated data and to process the huge amount of information available (e.g. use of spatial data warehouses; non-relational databases; processing of raster databases or continuous fields).

The purpose of this special issue is to present the latest advances in the field of spatial databases for digital earth (focusing on data storage, integration and processing). Various application areas can be presented (earth observation, geosciences, environment, agriculture, natural hazards, etc.). The main topics of the special issue will be:

  • Databases for storing data produced from remote sensing systems
  • Storage of data collected by sensors networks
  • Spatial data query and aggregations in large infrastructures (relational databases, No SQL, etc.)
  • Continuous fields and raster databases: representation, map algebra and performance issues
  • Spatial data integration and Extraction-Transformation-Loading tools
  • Efficient storage, integration and processing of volunteered geographic information
  • Spatial data warehouses and Online Analytical Processing tools
  • New spatial data standards and infrastructures
  • Spatial data quality management and integrity constraints
  • Spatial “big data”
  • Spatial data storage in cloud computing
  • Spatial databases of simulation results
  • Digital earth data and ontologies
  • Spatial data mining in digital earth data
  • New conceptual, logical and physical spatial data representations
  • New models for representing uncertain spatial data
  • etc.

The paper submission deadline is September 30th, 2014.

Authors will submit their manuscripts on-line http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tjde20

 

Source: http://digitalearth-isde.org/news/667 (ISDE Secretariat)

 

ESA’s 7th EO Summer School, ESA/ESRIN, 04 to 14 August 2014

EOSS2014_poster

European Space Agency (ESA) organises a series of summer schools on Monitoring of the Earth System to promote the exploitation of Earth Observation EO data across disciplines, with a specific focus on their assimilation into Earth System models.

The two-week course, held in ESA/ESRIN (near Rome, Italy) during August (typically every two years) aims to provide students with an integrated end-to-end perspective going from measurement techniques to end-user applications. Courses include lectures covering issues related to Remote Sensing, Earth System Modelling and Data Assimilation as well as hands-on computing exercises on the processing of EO data. Students have the opportunity to present their work during a poster session. The three best posters will receive an award from the European Meteorological Society (EMS). Keynote lectures on global change issues are also given to discuss the current state of the science of global change and its relationship to society in order to help students appreciate how their specific field fits into a broader scientific and political context. For more information, please see previous programme, news or video.

The school is open to Early Career Scientists (i.e. Ph.D. students, young post-doctoral scientists) who are specialised in a variety of Earth Science disciplines and wish to expand and improve their knowledge and skills. Participation is limited to a maximum of 60 students and is highly competitive. There is no fee for the school but students are expected to cover their own travel and accommodation cost (unfortunately, financial support is not available).

All enquiries should be addressed to eotraining@esa.int

Students wishing to participate can apply online at
https://earth.esa.int/web/eo-summer-school/application-submission

 

Source: https://earth.esa.int/web/eo-summer-school/home

TIMELAPSE Project: “Time and Space”

TimeLapse

Spacecraft and telescopes are not built by people interested in what’s going on at home. Rockets fly in one direction: up. Telescopes point in one direction: out. Of all the cosmic bodies studied in the long history of astronomy and space travel, the one that got the least attention was the one that ought to matter most to us Earth.

That changed when NASA created the Landsat program, a series of satellites that would perpetually orbit our planet, looking not out but down. Surveillance spacecraft had done that before, of course, but they paid attention only to military or tactical sites. Landsat was a notable exception, built not for spycraft but for public monitoring of how the human species was altering the surface of the planet. Two generations, eight satellites and millions of pictures later, the space agency, along with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), has accumulated a stunning catalog of images that, when riffled through and stitched together, create a high-definition slide show of our rapidly changing Earth. TIME is proud to host the public unveiling of these images from orbit, which for the first time date all the way back to 1984.

Over here is Dubai, growing from sparse desert metropolis to modern, sprawling megalopolis. Over there are the central-pivot irrigation systems turning the sands of Saudi Arabia into an agricultural breadbasket — a surreal green-on-brown polka-dot pattern in the desert. Elsewhere is the bad news: the high-speed retreat of Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska; the West Virginia Mountains decapitated by the mining industry; the denuded forests of the Amazon, cut to stubble by loggers.

It took the folks at Google to upgrade these choppy visual sequences from crude flip-book quality to true video footage. With the help of massive amounts of computer muscle, they have scrubbed away cloud cover, filled in missing pixels, digitally stitched puzzle-piece pictures together, until the growing, thriving, sometimes dying planet is revealed in all its dynamic churn. The images are striking not just because of their vast sweep of geography and time but also because of their staggering detail. Consider: a standard TV image uses about one-third of a million pixels per frame, while a high-definition image uses 2 million. The Landsat images, by contrast, weigh in at 1.8 trillion pixels per frame, the equivalent of 900,000 high-def TVs assembled into a single mosaic.

These Timelapse pictures tell the pretty and not-so-pretty story of a finite planet and how its residents are treating it — razing even as we build, destroying even as we preserve. It takes a certain amount of courage to look at the videos, but once you start, it’s impossible to look away.

Source: http://world.time.com/timelapse

 

5th Open Source Opportunities in GIS Summer School: Open Web Services & Web Map Applications, 7-11 July 2014, Girona, Spain

5th Open Source GIS Summer School

The GIS and Remote Sensing Centre of the University of Girona, the Nottingham Geospatial Institute of the University of Nottingham and Prodevelop (partner of OpenGeo) welcome you to the 5th Open Source GIS Summer School which will be focused on the development and creation of Open Web Mapping Services and Web Applications.

The Open Source Opportunities in GIS Summer School of Girona is an initiative aimed to meet the GIS professional demands related to free and open solutions.

GIS Open Source Summer School 2014 aims to build upon the success of the previous editions to ensure the highest quality of results and to prepare students in an international working environment and to develop competitive skills with emphasis on collaboration during the course. We started on this initiative focussing on the advantages of using Free and Open Source Software for GIS from the first edition of this Summer School.

If you are interested in application development and creation of web map services using the most widely used free and open source market products such as PostGIS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, then this is your opportunity.

Applications to the Summer School must be submitted before 27th June.

 

Source: http://www.sigte.udg.edu/summerschool2014


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